The Bissau diplomat says Marcelino da Mata is a Portuguese problem Guinea Bissau

In a text that Sidney Monteiro, advisor to Nuno Nabian, Prime Minister of Guinea-Bissau, shared on Facebook, Delfim da Silva, permanent representative of the Republic of Guinea-Bissau to the United Nations, marked a distance from the controversy in Portugal that included the In memory of Lieutenant Colonel Marcelino da Mata, who died in Lisbon on February 11th and fell victim to covid-19. The past of those who chose to fight with Portuguese troops should have no current consequences. “It cannot disrupt the building of respect, friendship and cooperation between Guinea-Bissau and Portugal,” he defended.

Among those who claimed to be the most distinguished member of the Portuguese Army by the dictatorship, those who accused him of war crimes and the vote of regret voted in favor of the PS, PSD, CDS this Thursday in the Assembly of the Republic , Liberal initiative and enough, Fernando Delfim da Silva opts for a different approach.

The diplomat goes back 47 years and recalls the unilateral proclamation of Guinea-Bissau’s independence on September 24, 1973. He mentions international support for this PAIGC decision [Partido Africano para a Independência da Guiné e Cabo Verde] then emerged and the external and internal problems that motivated the Marcello Caetano regime, as evidence of the untenability of the Portuguese colonial empire in Africa and as a harbinger of new times.

Seven months after the proclamation of independence by the PAIGC on April 25, 1974, the movement of the armed forces, inspired by the captains, defeated the dictatorship and announced in its program the well-known three “D” of the Portuguese future: democratize, decolonize and develop.

Posted by Sydney Monteiro on Sunday February 21st, 2021

“The scream of Medina do Boé [proclamação da independência] he had removed all doubts, ”recalls the diplomat. And on November 11, 1975, with the proclamation of Angola’s independence, the Portuguese imperial cycle in Africa ended. “That should of course be said for good historical culture for the new generations, not just the new generations of Guineans,” he writes.

This is why Fernando Delfim da Silva believes that Marcelino da Mata was defeated in Guinea-Bissau, the country where he was born. “Marcelino da Mata stumbled and fell in Guinea-Bissau,” he recalls. And he stressed that the past of those who chose to fight with Portuguese troops should have no current consequences. “It cannot interfere with the development of respect, friendship and cooperation between Guinea-Bissau and Portugal,” he emphasizes.